Books Boys Love

Moms often ask us for book recommendations for their 8-12 year old sons. This particular gender and age reader combination can be challenging for many families. Even if the boys are reading independently, many do not just dive into novels the way that girls seem to.

Keeping in mind that boys tend to love “real” things, we encourage mamas to investigate as many high quality nonfiction options that they can. Most boys tend to have a couple of clearly defined interests (horses, sports, military history, engineering, knights, etc.) and so mamas can start there. Look for nonfiction in your son’s preferred subject area. If you let him, he will chase the rabbit trails that lead into other subject areas.

Also, we highly recommend Childcraft books. The Childcraft books have so much to offer families and boys in particular. Please follow this link to the Childcraft section of our website.

Beyond non-fiction, however, there are many excellent fiction books that boys love (that aren’t fantasy). This post will always be a work in progress. We will list what we have now and then we will update it as we add more reviews in this category. This list is not exhaustive. A quick scroll through the children’s section of our website will yield many more good and great books. This is just a short cut to some of our favorite books that boys love.

Books We Love To Recommend To Boys
(Click on the book title to go to our full review)

Good Old Archibald – The story is classically boy: wrestling in the backyard, sliding down clothing chutes, and lots and lots of baseball. Also a story about friendship, adoption, and boy life.

Old Sam Dakota Trotter – A frontier story about a pair of brothers and their move to North Dakota. They rescue a thorough-bred trotting horse and have exciting adventures. Semi-autobiographical, this book reads like Farmer Boy or some other boy memoir.

The Growly Books – New books from living authors, this inventive series is absolutely wonderful for family read aloud and also for high adventure boys. While it features dressed animals, it is full of engineering, adventure, friendship, and adrenaline.

The Year of the Black Pony – This frontier story has a really hard start but resolves quickly into a tender tale of step-parents, love of a horse, and farm life. My boys loved the Farmer Boy-like feel.

The Winged Watchman – This WWII story follows a Dutch family during the German occupation of Holland. The family operates the last non-electric windmill. Boys like this book because of the war details, the mechanical aspects of the windmills, and the heroism.

Twenty One Balloons – This imaginative story is small, full of cool illustration, and loved by boys for its emphasis on mechanical wonders.

The Black Stallion – This story opens with an ocean voyage which ends in shipwreck. A boy and a wild horse are the only survivors washed up on a deserted island. The book divides into sections. The first part has a strong survivalist flavor. The middle section is more focused on relationships. The last portion of the book is all horse and horse racing.

Dinotopia – These James Gurney masterpieces are almost impossible to resist. The art is a feast for the eyes. The symbiotic relationship between dinosaurs and man is intriguing. The storytelling is a fascinating blend of mechanical engineering, cool science, intrigue, and “what if” type possibilities.

Little Britches – I never tire of recommending these. Boys love the frontier challenges, the horses, and the father-son relationship. I think that these are better than Little House On The Prairie for boys.

The Incredible Journey – When my nine-year-old son was reading this book, he would not come up for air. The story was gripping in places, hilarious in other places, and generally very intriguing. At mealtimes he would pepper the family conversation with little naturalist facts he had learned from the story. Happy ending, so no worries, mama.

Henry and the Chalk Dragon – Written specifically for middle school students, this modern book with an old soul delights and entertains boys. It is funny, exciting, contemporary, and inspiring.

The Bark of the Bog Owl – A medieval reimagining of David and Goliath, this book is the stuff that little boys are made of! Aidan is noble, courageous, boyishly boy. He has more than one adventure, wrestles in the mud with an alligator, pulls catfish out of the river with his bare hands, slays a giant, nearly gets lost in underground mines, and kills a panther. High adventure, excellent values, and beautiful writing.

Enemy Brothers – A WWII story about brothers, war, and trust. Gritty, passionate, and complex, this is for an older reader.

 

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